Home
  The meeting place for Ducati Multistrada owners
Search the forums (advanced)
 
 Navigation
  Home
  Forums
  Photo albums
  Links
  Downloads
  Multistrada Wiki
  About us
 Login

Username:


Password:


 Log me on automatically each visit


Problems signing in?

Register
 
Forum index -   Wanna buy: Multistrada 1000 as first Bike?
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Post new topicReply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic
®ob
MTS: 05 1000 DS (Red)

   

Joined: 12 Oct 2004
Posts: 37
Location: Netherlands, Vlaardingen

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 6:19 am Reply with quote

I already posted this question in a dutch forum but like to know what you think:

I am still taking lessons, but Im reading as much as I can about bikes, reviews, test drives. I can't get enough of it.
Dispite some crititcal notes about the Multistrada I fell in love with this bike. I saw her and was able to touch her in real on the Motorrai in Amsterdam. Of course havent been able to have a test drive. (is it her?)

My question: is it wise to buy a Multistrada 1000 as the first bike? Or should I stick to the new Multistrada 620 with the risk (they say) that you want a havier one within a year?
The difference in weight should not be the problem I think, and people say the Multistrada is easy to handle.

I know: everything depends on test drives etc but to I like to have some fun before.

I like to have your opinion

Rob
View user's profileSend private message Top
Martin Fernlund
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 31 Aug 2004
Posts: 58
Location: Sweden

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 8:18 am Reply with quote

First of all you should think about how you will use your bike. I think the 620 would be a lot of fun to drive around in town and on shorter trips. The 1000 is a better choice if you intend to go touring with a passenger and also if you if you are an experienced rider and like fast active riding on curved roads, then you wíll enjoy the stronger engine...

The 620 should be a better bike to start with but if you already think about the 1000, then perhaps you should go for it. To trade the 620 after only a year is not the best for the private economy.
View user's profileSend private message Top
Tee-Dub
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 17 Jun 2004
Posts: 612
Location: Vancouver Washington USA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 1:24 pm Reply with quote

Handling the bike shouldn't be too difficult as long as you aren't too short. The main concern would be a silly mistake of dropping the bike or crashing it in the first year or two. The Multistrada 1000 is an expensive bike for a beginner, but if money isn't a concern, then go for it. Don't let the 992cc motor scare you off. Twins are much more user friendly than inline fours and the Multi is a very easy bike to ride.

_________________
Just another day with the parasites!
View user's profileSend private messageAIM Address Top
ian916
MTS: 04 1000 DS (Red)

   

Joined: 25 Nov 2003
Posts: 304
Location: Sussex UK

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 2:10 pm Reply with quote

Not sure I agree with the idea of going for a 1000cc first bike idea. I think you learn to be a better rider by doing the progression thing in stages, I also am not sure that the 1000 V(L) twin is the easiest of engines to learn to ride with, - the engine below 4000 rpm is not that nice. The brakes are too fierce, these are race brembos on long travel forks, grab an inexperienced handful with the wheel turned too far and you will loose the front end, or have the dive of the forks catch you out. The rear brake is also no learner aid.

Also to be boring statistics show that inexperienced riders getting on bikes like this are a lot more likely to kill themselves so whilst I would hate to put somebody off buying a MS1000DS I would never recommend it to somebody new to biking. You can easily enter a bend at 80mph on these things, the most common way of killing yourself is when an inexperienced rider does this, panics part way round, brakes or sits up, goes wide into oncoming traffic. Entry speed of 50-60mph you should be able to cope with, you coordination will work easier at that speed. There is a very good side to riding a multi, in that as a naked bike you are more aware of speed, - so I would say get a naked bike, - it is very easy to be unaware of speed when you have no wind blast. I have not ridden the 620 multi, I rode a 620 monster and would say that it is a good bike for a first timer.

Actually to be blunt I would say buying a 1000DS would be very stupid, regardless of how rich you are. If depreciation is an issue when buying motorbikes don't get into motorbikes then, if you get to really love it don't put a value to it, you won't ever make money at it. Also your own life is worth a lot more than the deprecation on a 620 MS.

I am sure that most of us here got to riding 1000cc bikes as a natural progression, get real guys. I still look back on my times and rides on 250 bikes with great affection. I also remember the first ride back home after buying a Suzuki GSx1100 Katana, aged 19. It scarred the life out of me, and I had been riding for 3 and a bit years on road and a few before that off road.

_________________
Ducati Sporting Club
View user's profileSend private messageVisit poster's website Top
chris92
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 21 May 2004
Posts: 44
Location: Bucks

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 2:38 pm Reply with quote

hi rob
I was going to say that it would be fine to get the 1000 as a first bike. I had 3 months on a sport 600 4 on a vfr and 3 on a new mad 600 before moving away from the dark side into the light.

Generally I short shift alot (change gear early) and potter around and other times I'm honing around like mad so you can do both on the 1000
I feel the multi is easy to ride more so than the 600's due to the riding position etc BUT

After reading what Ian had to say I agree with him as well and maybe time is better spent on a 600 or so learning the trade and also seeing if you like it. Doing your test and then using a bike i think are two different things and having a multi in the garage just looking good??????? I don't know

Hope you can make sense of all that

Chris
View user's profileSend private message Top
grizz
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 21 Oct 2004
Posts: 59
Location: Tampa, FL USA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 4:25 pm Reply with quote

Hey Rob,

I think the the MS 1000 would be fine for a (sane) beginner. Sure you could use that big engine to go way too fast and hurt yourself bad. But you could do the same thing on a 600cc engine. I think what's in the bikes engine doesn't matter as much as what's between the rider's ears.

As a new rider you are going to make mistakes as you learn. If you ride cautiously, I think your mistakes on the MTS wouldn't be any worse than the mistakes you'd make on a 600.

In particular I think the torquey low end, and broad useable power band would be very freindly for beginners. (However the bike does get very choppy below 3000 RPMs.)

In summary, I say listen to the cautionary words of the others. You can get yourself in alot of trouble with this big engine. But you know yourself. If you can be cautious and use restraint while you're learning, this could be a great bike for you.
View user's profileSend private message Top
Monster1000Sie
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 05 Mar 2004
Posts: 2
Location: U.S.A.

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 5:40 pm Reply with quote

Quote:

Actually to be blunt I would say buying a 1000DS would be very stupid, regardless of how rich you are.

I think the the MS 1000 would be fine for a (sane) beginner. Sure you could use that big engine to go way too fast and hurt yourself bad. But you could do the same thing on a 600cc engine.


I bought a Monster 1000 (same motor as Multistrada 1000) earlier this year as my first bike! I only ride on sunny weekends, and so far have only a little over 1000 miles on it. I haven't dropped it or had any real scares, but I'm a pretty conservative rider. I also realize that with only 1000 miles of riding experience, I'm still a beginner, and have a lot to learn. Monsters are not as long-ride friendly as Multistrada's, but as I usually only have time for 2-3 half-day rides each month, the Monster works well for me.
I agree that the DS1000 motor may seem like it's too much power for a newbie, but the power comes on very smoothly and the gearing is high (too high on the Monster). I went on a Ducati Club ride last weekend, followed a Monster 620 rider who had somewhat more experience than I, and he certainly held his own in the corners. I could easily put on some power out of a corner and narrow the gap, but he is very satisfied with the power of his 620. I know that I will someday be able to use more of the power of the 1000 in areas I don't try to use it now. Some told me that I would out-grow a 620 too quickly, and after test rides, I was comfortable I could manage the 1000. I have no regrets. Bottom line, the DS1000 twin motor can be managed by a "Sane" new rider. Just get what you want!
View user's profileSend private message Top
DougM
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 7
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 8:17 pm Reply with quote

I agree that it is how you use your head that is important. My first bike is the Multistrada 1000. I have been riding for just over a year and not had any problems. I have focused on riding within the limites of my skills and not the bikes. The MS has not been hard to control, the brakes, throttle and handling are great and very stable. As long as you keep your wits about you, it is a terrfic ride to grow with.

DougM
View user's profileSend private message Top
DougM
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 7
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 8:18 pm Reply with quote

I agree that it is how you use your head that is important. My first bike is the Multistrada 1000. I have been riding for just over a year and not had any problems. I have focused on riding within the limites of my skills and not the bikes. The MS has not been hard to control, the brakes, throttle and handling are great and very stable. As long as you keep your wits about you, it is a terrfic ride to grow with.

DougM
View user's profileSend private message Top
zorgo
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 23 May 2004
Posts: 69
Location: Glasgow, Scotland.

PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2004 8:21 pm Reply with quote

As Ian says;learn to walk before you start running!
Without wanting to sound condecending, just remember that these lessons teach you how to pass your test; once you pass your test, you learn how to ride!
Hope you make the right decision and ride safe. Z.
View user's profileSend private message Top
prof_daniel
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 4
Location: Taiwan

PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 3:11 am Reply with quote

I agree with ian916.
Speaking from my personal experience, it is wise to start from a less powerful bike and master the riding techniques before get into a 1 litre bike. Well, my first bike is a 800cc Triumph Bonnevilli and I crashed at a bend that I end up hospitalized for 1 month. Even though injury did not take away my passion on 2 wheels, my neck problem really cause me a problem. Then after recovery, I bought a Ducati monster 400cc, to start ‘learning’ again. Handlings are better in less torquey and powerful bike, and the monster 400 gave me a lot of fun in the twisties. Now I have more confident and so I bought a Multistrada 1000ds.
People told me why not go for the best when I bought Monster 400, but I think it is always nice to have something under your control. Meanwhile, changing bikes gradually is part of the fun, why go for the top powers to start with.


Last edited by prof_daniel on Sun Nov 07, 2004 12:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
View user's profileSend private messageYahoo Messenger Top
SCOTT
MTS: 03 1000 DS (Gray)

   

Joined: 18 May 2003
Posts: 154
Location: San Francisco, CA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 4:17 am Reply with quote

While I agree with Ian916, I'd rather suggest a Dirt Bike like a KTM 450 as a first bike. If off-road is not practical, a used Suzuki SV 650 (90 deg V-Twin) is a great all-around road bike and perhaps the best choice.

Having said that however, the 1000 MTS is (to me) the most friendly and practical bike I could want and could be just fine as a first bike. (It has alot less HP than a Japanese 600, is light and sits up like a dirt bike.) If as a beginner, you are of above average maturity Razz , height Rolling Eyes, intelligence Shocked and not concerned about the cost of owning /maintaining the bike Whistle, you will do just fine.
As easy modifications for a beginner, I would suggest a 14 tooth front sprocket, KTM Handguards and Cyclecat IMS frame sliders... just to be safe.

Just PLEASE take a professional new motorcycle rider school before you buy ANYTHING.


Just my opinion...

Scott
View user's profileSend private message Top
babur
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 31 Mar 2004
Posts: 35
Location: amsterdam

PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 10:57 am Reply with quote

I went through the very same dilemma roughly about a year ago. I had started taking lessons without any prior experience and got my licence in february in amsterdam.

My initial approach was exactly the same, to go for a smaller engine, BMW650GS. Monster was never an option for me due to the cramped seating position. But after having a test ride and with the support of the sales tactics of the dealer, I ended up having a 2nd hand MTS1000DS. Biking only on weekends from May till Sep I made 5000km. And in September I made 1250km in two days from Istanbul to Antalya in Turkey on a Aprilla Capanord (rented).

I still am a newbie, I keep on making all sorts of mistakes on cornering, braking, gearing and in throttle control but I am able to cope with 1000DS as long as I do not forget about my limits.

If I had read Ian a year ago, I would not have bought 1000DS. If you do not plan to make highway commuting/touring, I believe you should definitely stick with Ian's recommendations for the first few years. Highways are never that much fun anyway...
View user's profileSend private message Top
ian916
MTS: 04 1000 DS (Red)

   

Joined: 25 Nov 2003
Posts: 304
Location: Sussex UK

PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 3:17 pm Reply with quote

Perhaps my reply was a bit "harsh" but it was in that tone for a reason, - to be read and generate opinion/reply.

I actually think that as motorcyclists we cannot advise another on something like this without knowing that person and how they ride, - what their general attitude is and so on. If a friend of a friend asked you this question in a pub I imagine you would ask them some more questions and then form an answer. Again sounds a bit stuffy but looking at the replies from people that have a MS 1000 early on they do quantify that decision by telling us of their restraint. Sorry to say this but you newbie MS's are a minority, statically your chance of accident is high. Go on any "jack the lad" (visordown.com) website message board and the replies would have go for it, don't be a poof and so on.

I still say go for a smaller bike early on, - I just feel that I learned something along the way with less power, - I tend to agree with the choice of a trail/off road style of bike as you have a choice to learn away from traffic, - even an hour off road will teach you more about bike control than a season of road riding will.

Whatever you choose Rob, make sure you spend some time riding with experienced riders, don't be afraid of the road but respect it, treat every other road user as somebody who is out to get you, - never assume that as it is your right of way that they are not going to pull out, turn across you etc.

Smile

_________________
Ducati Sporting Club
View user's profileSend private messageVisit poster's website Top
grizz
MTS: Not specified

   

Joined: 21 Oct 2004
Posts: 59
Location: Tampa, FL USA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 11:45 pm Reply with quote

ian916 wrote:
I tend to agree with the choice of a trail/off road style of bike as you have a choice to learn away from traffic, - even an hour off road will teach you more about bike control than a season of road riding will.

Whatever you choose Rob, make sure you spend some time riding with experienced riders...
Smile


I couldn't agree more with those points. I rode dirt bikes for 10 years before I got on a street bike. I got alot of my dumbest mistakes out of my system before I even started riding on pavement. So, by all means, if you have the opportunity to get on a dirt bike in an offroad environment, do it. It's a good way to hone your skills in a somewhat safe environment.

Also, if you find some mature, experienced riders to spend some time with I think you'll progress much more quickly. Find people better than you. (And I don't necessarily mean faster.) Then, watch how they ride. You'll pick up little tips on how to stay safe and ride well. Never stop learning.

Anyway, congratulations on your decision to ride a motorcycle. Stay safe and have fun.
View user's profileSend private message Top
Post new topicReply to topic  Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Display posts from previous:    All times are
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum